Jesus, I Come

Jesus-I-Come
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Out of my bondage, sorrow and night,
Jesus, I come, Jesus, I come;
Into Thy freedom, gladness and light,
Jesus, I come to Thee;
Out of my sickness into Thy health,
Out of my want and into Thy wealth,
Out of my sin and into Thyself,
Jesus, I come to Thee.

Out of my shameful failure and loss,
Jesus, I come, Jesus, I come;
Into the glorious gain of Thy cross,
Jesus, I come to Thee;
Out of earth’s sorrows into Thy balm,
Out of life’s storms and into Thy calm,
Out of distress to jubilant psalm,
Jesus, I come to Thee.

Out of unrest and arrogant pride,
Jesus, I come, Jesus, I come;
Into Thy blessèd will to abide,
Jesus, I come to Thee;
Out of myself to dwell in Thy love,
Out of despair into raptures above,
Upward for aye on wings like a dove,
Jesus, I come to Thee.

Out of the fear and dread of the tomb,
Jesus, I come, Jesus, I come;
Into the joy and light of Thy Home,
Jesus, I come to Thee;
Out of the depths of ruin untold,
Into the peace of Thy sheltering fold,
Ever Thy glorious face to behold,
Jesus, I come to Thee.

William Sleeper
William Sleeper, an American home missionary and pastor, wrote the self-surrendering words of this song, collaborating with George Stebbins on the melody. Sleeper received his education at Phillips-Exeter Academy, the University of Vermont, and Andover Theological Seminary. After his ordination as a minister, he served in Worcester, Massachusetts for more than 30 years. Later, he was a pastor in Maine. He published a collection of poems called The Rejected King .

An amusing story is told of an experience composer George Stebbins had while leading the singing in a service led by D.L. Moody. It was Stebbins’ first time working with Moody, and he felt somewhat nervous as he played the organ. When he heard wheezing, discordant sounds, he thought there must be something wrong with the organ. Soon, however, he realised that the sounds were being made by Rev. Moody as he “sang” heartily! Unfortunately, the great preacher had no sense of pitch or tone.

An amusing story is told of an experience composer George Stebbins Click To Tweet

As you read, sing or listen to the words of the song, may you be helped from any of the negatives mentioned there into a free and closer relationship with Jesus.

As you read, sing or listen to the words of the song, may you be helped Click To Tweet

WORDS:WILLIAM SLEEPER MUSIC: GEORGE STEBBINS
S.A.SONG BOOK, 1987 EDITION, #300; 2015 EDITION, #472
REFERENCES: MORGAN, ROBERT J., THEN SINGS MY SOUL,BOOK 2
USAWEST.ORG

 

An ethereal, acoustic treatment of the classic hymn written by the performer’s ancestor. – stevesleepermusic.com

 

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