@saoshawa

Blog Author: Cheryl Mouland

Use search box below
Lets-Talk-ABout-It-As-a-Family

Lets Talk- Together as Family

When Mental Illness Strikes a Family I was diagnosed with anxiety and depression almost 17 years ago. In that time, I’ve had to learn how to cope and adjust to the challenges that living with a mental illness brings. In the course of those 17 years, both my children were also diagnosed with depression and

Read More »
I-Get-It-Feature

I Get it!

“ I get it.” Three little words. They don’t seem like much on their own but, when you put them together, they have the potential to change someone’s life. I heard those words and felt their impact after deciding to talk about my struggle with mental illness. The first time I shared my story, I

Read More »
Bell Lets Talk

This Broken Brain

My name is Cheryl and I’m engaged in a potentially life-long battle with mental illness. There it is, laid bare for all to read. It’s taken many years, but today I’m able to say those words, share my story and talk about an illness that has been kept “hush hush” for far too long. I’m

Read More »

Road Trip!

Summer is here! School is out, the kids are free, and the countdown for the long awaited “family vacation” is finally winding down. Some of you will be jetting off to sunny beaches or hopping on trains to visit family. You may even be sailing off into the sunset on a luxury cruise ship. You

Read More »
Scroll to Top

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is September 30th

THE SALVATION ARMY OSHAWA LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The Salvation Army Oshawa acknowledges the many Indigenous nations with longstanding relationships with the territories upon which our Church and our Community & Family Services are located. We acknowledge the land is covered under the Williams Treaties, and is part of the traditional territories of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

These ancestral and treaty lands; the present-day home to many First Nations, Metis, and Inuit people is where we meet, share hope, and build community.

We reflect on knowing the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home. We are treaty people, it is our privilege to build relationships through reconciliation.

While we cannot undo the past, we are committed to a different future and doing our part to contribute to an equitable, just, and grace-filled society.